About & Contact

Hi, and thanks for stopping by. My name is Shane. I’m a married Father of two, and a native of the #ShropshireHills.

I have a passion and love of the Countryside in Shropshire (and beyond!), and use photography as a means to express some of that passion.

I’m by no means a “photographer”, but I enjoy trying to capture some of what makes me, and hopefully you, smile!

You can see more of my photos here: Shropshire Hills

The majority of my work can be found on Twitter:

http://www.twitter.com/shropshirewalks

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The Shropshire Hills are one of the natural regions of England. They lie wholly within the county of Shropshire and encompass several distinctive and well-known landmarks, such as the Long Mynd, Wenlock Edge, The Wrekin and the Clees.

The Shropshire Hills lie south of the county capital of Shrewsbury between the Welsh border and Much Wenlock, extending as far south as Ludlow. To the north they are bounded by the Shropshire, Cheshire and Staffordshire Plain, to the east by the Severn Valley and Mid Severn Sandstone Plateau, to the southeast by the Teme Valley and to the southwest by the Clun and North West Herefordshire Hills.

The Shropshire Hills are listed as Natural Area No. 42 and also as National Character Area 65 by Natural England, the UK Government’s advisor on the natural environment. The NCA covers an area of 107,902 hectares (416.61 sq mi) and measure around 50 kilometres (31 mi) from west to east and north to south. The dominant pattern of the hills is a series of southwest to northeast ridges, scarps and valleys. They are characterized by steep, rounded ‘whaleback’ hills, often crowned with open moorland, with woodland dressing the steeper slopes. There are scattered farms in dales and sheltering in valleys; larger settlements being confined to the Stretton Valley and A49 corridor.

Roughly a half of the NCA lies within the Shropshire Hills AONB. In addition, the region contains two Special Areas of Conservation (The Stiperstones & The Hollies SAC; Downton Gorge SAC) and a national nature reserve (The Stiperstones NNR) as well as 73 Sites of Special Scientific Interest, the latter totalling 4,893 hectares (12,090 acres). Its major watercourses are the rivers Corve, Onny, Severn and Teme and the Ledwyche and Rea Brooks. The average elevation is 84 metres (276 ft); the highest point is Brown Clee Hill at 534 metres (1,752 ft).

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22 thoughts on “About & Contact

  1. Hey there Newbie Spikey!
    (for your info, a Spikey is the term for folk who are part of the clan known to be followers of Uncle Spike 🙂

    Thank you… I really appreciate that as I for one, know how many interesting and entertaining blogs are out there.

    Blogging since June 2013, my aim is to deliver an eclectic offering of posts, from my ‘point n shoot’ attempts at basic photography, to the sharing of my travel adventures over the decades, as well as day to day happenings here on the farm. Oh, plus a few observations, opinions and lighter-hearted stuff thrown in for good measure.

    I normally keep to a couple of posts a day, maybe 3-4 at weekends if I have something special to share. But if you are at a loose end one day, maybe you’ll enjoy trawling through some of my older stuff too. I have added plenty of categories to help in said digging process.

    Thanks again and hope you have a great day…

    UNCLE SPIKE

  2. You are indeed a photographer as your images are striking! Love the name Shane too. My sons are Owen (Welsh) and Liam (William Gaelic version). I have close friend who left the US to move to Herefordshire about twenty years ago after marrying a gentleman from that area. I also enjoyed the James Herriot books “All Things Great and Small” (hilarious tales of a country vet) which was set in the Yorkshire dales.

    • Thank you Kathy. I’m often mistaken for being Welsh, as we are only 5 miles away from the border, and our accent has a decidedly Welsh twang! You’re very kind to say such lovely things about my photographs. I just like to show off this part of the UK.
      My wife is a veterinary nurse, so loves James Herriots books. The TV adaptation of All Creatures Great and Small was a staple of my Sunday nights viewing as a child!

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